Posted at 3 Jun 2015

Interview with Guy Moorhouse

Designer, developer and animator Guy Moorhouse talks about collaborating with illustrator Malika Favre and his plans for an iOS game.

You recently designed a new site for illustrator Malika Favre. How did you come to work on this project?

Malika and I have known each other for quite a while, pretty much since our days working together at Airside. We also collaborated a couple of years ago on her Kama Sutra project and found we just work really well together. We'd talked a number of times about me making a site and shop for her. It was really just a question of finding the right time when we were both free of other commitments and could make it happen.

What was the most fun aspect?

It's just great working with someone who already knows how you think and approach problems - it makes the process a pleasure. Neither of us is afraid to say when we think something isn't working. It's about being honest and putting the work first. I think how well projects end up is intrinsically linked to the relationships between the people that make them.

What were you listening to while you worked on it?

I'm quite obsessive when it comes to music. I'll get into a few things and then listen to them incessantly until I just have to listen to something else. Then I'll repeat that process again. Working on this site I think I was listening to quite a bit of Panda Bear and Dan Deacon. I've also been listening a lot to Ghostly's Hohokum soundtrack and since watching Ex Machina, this Oliver Cheatham track has been pretty much on a loop.

What are you experimenting with at the moment in design and code?

I've been playing with Processing and making animations for a side project I have called Mooooooving which I'm really enjoying. I've also had an idea for an iOS game brewing for a while and it's looking hopeful that I'll be able to get that underway as part of a collaboration with an iOS developer. It'll be nice to focus more on graphics and art direction for a bit. I like not staying working in one discipline for too long.

It's just great working with someone who already knows how you think and approach problems—it makes the process a pleasure. Neither of us is afraid to say when we think something isn't working.