Posted at 7 Oct 2015

Interview with DTVK

Digital dream-team Kim Boutin and David Broner talk about their work for Kenzo and not being ‘proper’ designers.

Tell us about your collaborative history. Which art school did you go to and what made you start working together?

We met in 2008 during our graphic design studies at ENSAAMA Olivier de Serres. We got closer while we both felt out of place there, and started doing our own stuff together. At that time, we were photographing things, designing types, printing and binding books. Two years later, Kim went to Gobelins School of Image to study Interaction Design, and David focused on Digital Direction at Supinfocom. After graduating, Kim worked in a digital agency for luxury brands. In 2013, she was hired as Digital Art Director at Kenzo. Meanwhile, David worked with post-production companies on music videos and advertising. We then started collaborating as professionals on digital projects for Kenzo, with 3D environments and WebGL.

How do you think your specialisms complement each other?

On her own, Kim is able to create user interfaces. On his own, David is able to create 3D environments. Mixing both our specialisms allows us to create unusual projects. While most web designers were obsessed with minimalistic flat design, we turned users' smartphones into remotes to browse a 3D art gallery.

What do you have on your desktops?

There are notebooks where we sketch wireframes, fashion magazines (Garage, Elephant and Antidote) and art publications we've found at the Whitechapel Gallery's Library (Secret Power by Simon Deeny, Mould Map by Landfill Editions and the Ars Viva Prize 2015 catalogue). On our computers’ desktops, Kim has screenshots of glitched interfaces and David has a folder filled with visual references which are randomly used as wallpapers.

What makes DVTK different?

Probably the fact that we don't consider ourselves as ‘proper’ designers. We take digital design as a medium to create interactive experiences rather than a goal in itself. To draw a parallel with product design, we feel closer to Gaetano Pesce than Dieter Rams.

While most web designers were obsessed with minimalistic flat design, we turned users' smartphones into remotes to browse a 3D art gallery